Whose greetings?

A few years ago I realised if you add an “s” to my surname  you end up with Season, particularly handy at Christmas time.

I started with a die cut Christmas card – S on the front cover and “eason’sxmas-1 greetings” on the inside and simply mailed them with no writing or message to friends and clients. That drew an interesting response, half the people I know said “some idiot sent a card and forgot to sign it” and those who realised wrote their own massage and sent them back to me the following Christmas.

Since then I have been doing something similar each year.

2014
2014
2015
2015
2016
2016

There have been many others but you get the drift.

The Value of a Photographer

As a professional photographer for 40 plus years I can’t help but ponder the value of my profession in society.

Value can be measured in different ways and it’s easy to relate it to money but value also relates to a contribution or role, what we give.

So what do we give or provide?

We document society, we provide a photographic record of what has been and who we are. We record significant events and moments in time that usually cant be repeated and the true importance of that is usually not valued until some time later – also know as “too late”. Images tell our story, our life’s journey and history

We live in an era where digital images dominate, smart phones pervade our life and we progressively rely on digital technologies to record, share and store our stories. Many fail to understand that generations to come, our children and grandchildren, may want to look back at their ancestry but the rapid advancement of technology over that time may not allow them to either find or view those images.

I bought a computer twenty five years ago, it is not compatible with any current operating system or software, it can not read a DVD or CD (nor can the one I bought a month ago) it does not have USB /firewire port and if that change can happen in twenty five years past we have to ask what changes will happen twenty five years into the future

I believe as a professional photographer my industry has a duty to ensure society is not denied its visual history through that inevitable change in technology.

The value we bring is more than taking photographs it’s working with our clients and society so they understand the responsibility we share in ensuring generations to come can look back and see their heritage.

My grandparents left me (and my children) part of their heritage, a professional photograph printed by a craftsmen.

It’s compatible with the one operating system that will be available for all generations to come…
The Human Eye!

1918 was a challenging time in history but they were wise enough to invest in recording their story, and I’m thankful they did.

This video will explain the importance of printing our significant moments.

Pulling the plug on Sydney Harbour

I was asked by an agency to work on a project for a multi-national industrial pump company as part of a national billboard and magazine campaign. The target audience were open cut mine sites and as the budget was relatively humble we had to find a way to complete the project within certain constraints.

This is the original concept brief that I was presented with. In discussions with the agency the options of shooting at a different time of day or angle were discounted for reasons outside my control. I’m part of a team when I work for an agency hence have to work to the direction I am given.

The starting point was the base image of Sydney Harbor shot from the South Pylon lookout on the Harbor Bridge, this is where the reference shot (above) was also taken from.

Part of the brief was a cracked earth harbor floor and without a suitable image to use I decided to build my own model in our car-park, bags of dirt and clay make plenty of mud and a few days in the sun does the rest and while this gave me the base it was still a little too “outback” so I created a blending layer with sand shot at a nearby beach to give a bit more of a coastal feel.

 

From that point on it was a matter of trying to visualize what the harbor may look like once you pull the plug. I checked on Google but they had no images that went back to the last Ice age so for me it was simply a matter of looking at the surrounding geography and visualizing where those lines may go.
Starting with the most obvious feature the Opera House sitting on “ Bennelong Point” I went back to nearby coastal features and looked at some headlands and grabbed a bit of a point on Stradbroke Island.

I slipped that under the Opera House and extended the seawall around the opera house so it looked as though it was reaching down to the point, in addition I added a bit of drainage run off at the same time. I have no idea if the storm water drains are there but I have seen them in other facilities in similar environments.

I used the same method for the entire harbor shore line adding or more so extending the harbor edge so it looked as though it was a very low tide. This uncovered some unanticipated issues that had to be resolved, there was a frigate moored at Garden Island. To resolve this I found some plans for hull design then recreated that in photoshop and blended with the above waterline image.

In Farm Cove, next to the Opera House they are constructing some over water decking so this too had to be extended below the waterline

Another aspect I considered was in any river valley there is still some indication of the stream and being an ex Sydney boy I knew that Tank Stream formed part of Circular Quay, to help create this I found features on a coastal beach that had, at a different scale, the style of receding stream that I could blend in to the existing harbor floor.

Sydney Harbor is a busy place at the best of times and we decided with the agency that it should have some elements of distressed boating features without going over board
(pardon the pun), again visualizing what a boat might look like when it runs out of water. I shot some boats from appropriate angles (while I was shooting the base image) so they would look like they had settled at irregular angles on the harbor floor and included the dregs of the “Tank” stream that you see in dried out inland rivers. The jet boat was actually on the harbor the day I shot the base plate.

For the Photoshop junkies the layers count, including all layer groups, went into the triple figures.

The end result….

Weir Mutiflow Pumps
Weir Mutiflow Pumps

Personal Passions

Someone asked me recently what I like to shoot for myself, so I thought I would show and explain what I shoot and why.
I was working in the USA a few years ago and by accident bumped into US Photographer Michael Belk. Michael was a high end Fashion/Advertising photographer based in New York who had just moved to Florida with a goal to shoot what he wanted, how he wanted.

He had set up a gallery displaying mostly landscape, he told me that for the bulk of his career he had shot what clients had told him to and he felt he was losing the passion for photography so he decided to start shooting for himself. As he told me I could relate exactly to what he was saying. As commercial photographers we try our best to work with clients and photograph their product or service so it will tell or sell their story and I found in myself that to relax I would actually put the camera down and turn off from photography. After talking with Michael I was determined from that point on to keep it in my hand when on holidays.

My wife and I are trekkers, our idea of a great holiday is to carry 24 kilo of food and equipment over a mountain range, preferably with no one else around, and I found this was the perfect escape for my personal photography, I don’t set out to create works of art I simply walk a trail slowly and allow nature to find me.

Sometimes I have to wait for some mist to clear or rain to stop and other times you simply look around and there it is. But the part I enjoy most of all is the silence or absences of man made noise. I can hear the wind or the water (be it running or falling) the sounds of nature, birds calling, but nothing else.

 

We can sit there looking at a scene knowing that we’re the only people at that place and time to experience the show that nature gives us and that is what I try and shoot for myself, that is my photographic passion.
As odd as it sounds we try not to walk when the weather is good because that is when most people choose to walk, we look for the fringe seasons when the weather keeps people away but creates the mood, light and feel that I enjoy.


Thinking inside the Box

I recently shot a project for John Robertson from OGE Group Architects, John had taken on a personal project of creating a holiday home out of three shipping containers at Buddina on the Sunshine Coast. The pictures below were shot just at the tail end of construction and illustrate what an architect can achieve with creative thinking.

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